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You Have Been Offered the Job…Now What? (Part II)

You have been offered the job and are now on probation. This is usually a scary time. You might begin to second-guess your decision, or you might be concerned that you won’t be able to live up to your new employer’s expectations. Although the following suggestions are meant for employers, as a new recruit, you will benefit tremendously from such advice. Thanks to human resources director, Dana Jarvis:

Navigate the construction. There will be times during this “test drive” that you will uncover development needs. Make a list and have a conversation with the new employee to discover learning and development opportunities.

Use the brakes. New employees may find it hard to learn the organizational nuances and culture, thus leading them down the wrong road. Take time out to check in with the new employee on a consistent basis to see how they feel about how things are going. Communicate, communicate—and then communicate some more.

Pay attention to the road ahead. By looking ahead to future organizational needs, you will be able to determine which role is best for new employees, based on an understanding of their strengths and weaknesses.

Source: Workforce Online – Dana Jarvis, human resources director, Snavely Forest Products, Pittsburgh, June 26, 2007. Jarvis also is an adjunct professor at Duquesne University.

You Have Been Offered the Job…Now What? (Part I)

You have been offered the job and are now on probation. This is usually a scary time. You might begin to second-guess your decision, or you might be concerned that you won’t be able to live up to your new employer’s expectations. Although the following suggestions are meant for employers, as a new recruit, you will benefit tremendously from such advice. Thanks to human resources director, Dana Jarvis:

Use a map to get from A to Z. It is important to set expectations for new employees during this trial period. Expectations can be set by creating goals and objectives that establish direction for the new employee. Plan small wins along the way to help them succeed.

Stop at red lights. Immediately address any wrong behaviors and help educate the new employee on expected company behaviors. Organizational culture is sometimes tricky to learn.

Go on green lights. Everyone has strengths. Once a new employee’s strengths are discovered, it is important to plug those strengths into organization opportunities. By having a conversation about the person’s strengths and observing them in action, you will have a much clearer understanding of how the new assets can be best leveraged.

Sightseeing is part of the drive. As you get to know the new employee and they get to know you and the organization, the goal is that both sides will get more comfortable with one another. Take the time to invite the new employee to organizational social events to get to know them outside of work.

Watch our next post for Part II.

Source: Workforce Online – Dana Jarvis, human resources director, Snavely Forest Products, Pittsburgh, June 26, 2007. Jarvis also is an adjunct professor at Duquesne University.

Daisy Wright Quoted in Toronto Star

I was again quoted in the Toronto Star of June 2, 2007 by Career Columnist, Janis Foord Kirk. Her series deals with the challenges that internationally-educated professionals face during their transition to Canada.

As I said in the article, employers need to get on board in understanding what these highly-educated immigrants are bringing to the table. Conversely, internationally-educated professionals need to be flexible and open to change. Things are somewhat different from ‘back home’.

Daisy Wright Recognized as ‘Outstanding Canadian Career Leader’

At the recently held conference of Career Professionals of Canada, I was awarded the prestigious award “Outstanding Canadian Career Leader”. Executive Director of the association, Sharon Graham said,

“Daisy Wright was nominated and awarded the prestigious Outstanding Canadian Career Leader Award for two very important reasons: She has proactively contributed to establishing Canadian résumé writing as a viable leader in a largely dominated US market. She has also significantly influenced the Canadian marketplace through numerous high-profile volunteer activities. Her supporting material outlined multiple significant achievements in 2006.”

The Wright Career Solution
http://www.thewrightcareer.com/

Daisy Wright Interviewed on Business News Network (WorkopolisTV)

My book No Canadian Experience, eh? has been getting rave reviews from readers, interviewers and other career experts. The link below will take you to an interview I did with Bruce Sellery of BNN (Workopolis.tv) which was aired on May 15, 2007.

http://www.bnn.ca/servlet/HTMLTemplate/!robVideo/robtv0726.20070515.00051000-00051309-clip1/h/220asf/

No Canadian Experience, Eh?

“No Canadian Experience, Eh?” Who knows this better than an internationally-educated professional or new immigrant trying to get a foot in the door of an employer. Sometimes it appears the focus is more on the ‘lack of Canadian work experience’ than on the individual’s long track record of successes.

If you are such an individual, don’t worry. You are not alone, as even those who have just graduated from college or university hear something similar – the lack of experience. This is where my book “No Canadian Experience, Eh?” comes in. It’s a handy career tool full of resources that can assist anyone in the job search market. Visit the website at www.nocanadianexperience-eh.com for additional information.

Seven Top 7 Reasons Companies Initiate Coaching Programs

The Conference Board of Canada has come up with 7 top reasons why companies initiate coaching programs:

1. Assist leadership development

2. Enhance career development

3. Orient new employees

4. Accelerate learning

5. Improve retention

6. Transfer knowledge from retiring employees

Source: Conference Board of Canada

Sometimes It’s Lonely on the Way to the Top (by Mark Victor Hansen)

As I read Mark’s newsletter this morning I was reminded of an article I wrote some months ago and it asked the following:

Have you ever wanted to do something really great for yourself but you are always confronted by BUT’s?

“I would like to change my job, BUT…”

“I would like to get a professional resume done, so I can begin to look for that job, BUT…”

“It would be great to find a career coach who could support me with my goals, BUT…”

“I would like to start a business, BUT…”

“It would be great to take some courses, BUT…”

Below is a paragraph from Mark Victor Hansen’s latest newsletter indirectly encouraging you to get rid of the BUT’s:

“The thing about following your dreams is that most people will think and say that you’re crazy, out of your mind, not thinking straight, you have your head in the clouds. This may even come from the people you love the most. Whatever the reasoning, some people will undoubtedly try to hold you back. Sometimes we have to let go of the people we’ve known the longest. Sometimes, when we go after our hearts’ desires, we have to let go of who and what we used to be. We have to break away from the pack and chase our own dreams. Perhaps you’re going after what you really want will inspire others to do the same. Even if it doesn’t, you still have to follow your path to your designated and dreamed-of greatness.”

Set your goals and follow your dream!

Daisy…Your Career Coach

Are you Conducting Your Job Search from Work?

** Are you using your company’s computer, fax machine, business e-mail account and office supplies to conduct your job search?

** Do you believe you are entitled to use the workplace to find a better job?

Though such activities are widespread, they are usually against company policy and could result in your dismissal.

Use common sense when conducting your job search at the office.

** Do not neglect the work you are paid to do

** Do not use the company’s telephone number or email address on your resume

** Conduct your job search outside business hours and away from the office

** Visit the local photocopying centre to make copies or fax your resume

The fact that you are unhappy with your job does not give you the right to use the workplace to find something better.

What’s Your Potential for Success…?

Weddle’s surveyed a total of 1,270 people about their potential for success in their future job search campaigns:

** 57.6% Responding to an ad posted on an Internet job board

** 16.8% Networking at business and social events

** 7.2% Responding to an ad posted on an employer’s Web-site

** 7.6% Sending a resume to an employer by mail

** 3.9% Receiving a call from a headhunter

** 1.9% Receiving a call from a staffing firm

** 1.9% Attending a career fair

** 1.6% Responding to a newspaper ad

** 0.7% Joining a social networking site

This survey shows that 58% of job seekers rely on Internet job boards to find a position.

Source: www.weddles.com