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9 Reasons You Are Failing Your Interviews

September is one of the most popular months for hiring, according to Monster. That means some job seekers are sharpening their resumes to meet the hiring onslaught, but how prepared are they for interviews? Over the past several weeks I have fielded calls or received emails that suggest some are treating this very important aspect of the job search as a casual event. They are leaving it for the last minute, then panicking when they are invited for the interview. Consider one such email:

As I read it, my mind was screaming, “Are you serious?” I wouldn’t fault him or her for reaching out, but when? This is one of the main reasons some job seekers fail their interviews. Here are some others:

#1: Inadequate Preparation

Don’t take your interview lightly. Preparation should begin the moment you submit your resume because you don’t know when an invitation will be extended. You put a lot of effort into preparing your resume and cover letter; do the same (or more) for the interview.

#2: Limited Company Research

Employers often state that most job candidates arrive at the interview without having researched the company. Some end up talking about Company Y when it should be Company X. Don’t limit your research to the company’s website. Search for any mentions in social media, industry publications, or on regular news channels.

#3: Believing You Can “Wing It”

Interviews are too important for you to think you can “wing it”. Far too many times I have encountered job candidates who, after trying on their own to “wing it” end up being very disappointed. Seek help from a family member, a friend or a career coach, and don’t leave it for last minute. You want to be well-prepared. Panicky emails or urgent messages within 2-4 days of your interview will unnerve rather than help you.

#4: Unable to Articulate Accomplishment Stories

Most job seekers fail at interviews because they have not learned the to tell their success stories. When the interviewer says, “Tell me a time when….”, it’s time for you to tell a story. This is your best chance to convince the interviewer(s) that you are the best person for the job. This method of interviewing, known as Behavioural Interviewing, offers the opportunity to relate your past successes, and the best way to do so is to tell stories. Therefore, in articulating your stories, be focused and engaged. You want to give clear, concise and confident answers, ensuring that you incorporate the results or outcomes of your actions.

#5: Engaging in Negative Mind-scripting

Don’t get caught up in a cycle of second-guessing yourself and your abilities. Start with a positive mind script that says you are going to get the job. This frees you up to think clearly. Some people become bogged down, before or during the interview, with the notion that the company has already designated someone for the position and are just going through the ropes. This belief is not always true, and even if it is, the fact you were invited to the interview suggests you have something the employer wants. It’s your opportunity to shine.

#6: Not Having Questions for the Interviewer

The interview is a two-way street. You are just as invested in the process as the employer. Go prepared with a few questions of your own:

  • Is there anything else I should know?
  • If I am the successful candidate, what would you like to see me accomplished within first 30 days?
  • From a performance standpoint, what aspects of this position would you most like to see improved?

#7: Omitting a Thank You Note

Contrary to what some people think, sending a “thank you” note is not a waste of your time. People in the career sphere believe you should send one. Wharton Professor, Adam Grant said, A Thank You note is so rare, it instantly separates you from the rest.” CareerBuilder tweeted, “Please” and “Thank you” never go out of style, and Right Management Manpower Group states, “Sending a proper thoughtful thank you note can make all the difference.”

However, a mere “Thank you for meeting with me, I really want the job”, is not good enough. Your thank you letter must have substance. You want to thank the people you interviewed with, but equally important, you want to use the letter to expand on a couple of points that were emphasized during the interview, and reiterate why you would be the ideal candidate to take on the role.

#8: Neglecting to Follow Up

Sometimes, despite your best efforts, you won’t get the job. You might hear that you were a close second, or the job was offered to someone with a better fit. It is disappointing, and you feel like giving up, but this is not the time to recoil. Take some time to clear your head, and then do what most job candidates would not do (especially if you are still keen to work for that particular company). Follow up! If you want to be remembered; if you want to leave a lasting impression on the interviewer(s), then follow up.

Following up will take courage and perseverance, but a few months after your interview, touch base to ask how things are going with the new hire. Most times, things would be fine, but in some rare instances, the person didn’t or isn’t working out. You could be following up at just the time they are considering looking for a replacement. This suggestion might be a stretch, but why not reach out to the successful candidate, at some point, and ask them how they were able to nail the interview?

#9: Discontinuing the Courtship

If #8 above didn’t work, it doesn’t mean you cannot continue the courtship. There could be other future openings. You can keep yourself on the company’s radar by sharing with them articles relevant to the industry or profession. You can also monitor their online forums, ask questions, and share your expertise.

What about alerting them to something their competitor is doing that they are not, then offering to help them compete? Your efforts could sway them to create a position for you, or they could refer you to some other person or company who would need your expertise.

It’s never over until it’s over, so don’t despair. Have courage and persevere. There is a job out there with your name on it.

If all else fails, why not connect with me so we can have a one-on-one discussion about how to ace your next interview?

Can My Dad Come to the Interview With Me?

 

When my son was in high school I often told him that if he went away to college, I would be moving next door. He hasn’t moved away, so I have no need to do that. That said, most of us as parents are very protective of our children and sometimes we go way overboard and become known as ‘helicopter parents’ – always hovering around! Of course, this can sometimes have a negative impact on the children, especially when they are in their early adult years.

 

In a recent survey of Executives by Officeteam, they witnessed some unusual parental behaviours:

  • “One parent wanted to sit in during the interview.”
  • “A parent called a politician to push me to hire his son.”
  • “A mother submitted her daughter’s resume on her behalf.”
  • “Someone stopped an employer at a grocery store to ask that person to hire her child.”
  • “A parent called to ask about a job applicant’s work schedule and salary.”
  • “A parent called during the interview to try to push me to hire her daughter.”
  • “I received a call from a father asking about the status of his son’s application.”
  • “A parent came by my desk and told me that he expected his daughter to get preference for a position since he was a manager at the company.”
  • “A mother called to ask how her child did in the job interview.”
  • “A parent called to find out why we did not hire her son and why we felt he was not qualified.”

Whether you are a helicopter parent or not, these five tips from Officeteam will equip you to help your son or daughter navigate the job search maze:

 

1. Branch out. Networking is still one of the best ways to find a job. Your friends and colleagues can help set up introductory meetings with employers and alert your job-seeking child to opportunities.

2. Give it another look. Review their resume and cover letter. Most times you can spot typos and other errors and make sure the most valuable information is included.

3. Do a test run. Offer to conduct mock interviews with them to practice responses to common questions. Give them constructive feedback on their answers and delivery.

4. Weigh the options. Offer to be their sounding board about potential opportunities. You can provide a different perspective and bring up points they could consider in their decision.

5. Offer encouragement. Looking for a job can be difficult, and it’s important to remain positive. Offer your parental advice and support throughout the process to keep them on track.

 

Read the full Officeteam article here