Executive Resume Writing and Career Services for Mid-Career Professionals, Managers and Executives

7 Job Search Do’s and Don’ts

Do s and  Donts 7 Job Search Dos and Donts

 

DON’T send a cover letter with “To Whom it May Concern”. It portends laziness and lack of interest.

DO the research to find the name of the person responsible for hiring.

 

DON’T use “References Available on Request” on your résumé.

DO use a quote from your performance appraisal or a testimonial that highlights your value.

 

DON’T replicate your job description when developing your résumé.

DO include powerful accomplishment-based statements that address the employer’s buying motivators or needs.

 

DON’T spend too much of your job search hours on the computer.

DO arrange more face time with people in your network.

 

DON’T send a generic Thank-you note after the interview.

DO send one that recaps key elements of the discussion and reiterates your interest in the position.

 

DON’T ask for a job at an informational interview.

DO ask for one or two names they recommend you contact.

 

DON’T relate your life story when asked “Tell me about yourself”.

DO talk about your education, work history, and what you have recently done for your company.

 

 

Image Credit: Dirjournal.com

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 7 Job Search Dos and Donts

About 

Daisy Wright is an award winning career coach, certified executive leadership development coach, certified career management coach, author, and certified resume strategist who collaborates with executives, managers, and mid-level professionals in all aspects of their job search and career. With more than 15 years in the careers industry, she has what it takes to guide you in the "Wright" direction!

Visit her website at www.thewrightcareer.com

About Daisy

Daisy Wright is an award winning career coach, certified executive leadership development coach, certified career management coach, author, and certified resume strategist who collaborates with executives, managers, and mid-level professionals in all aspects of their job search and career. With more than 15 years in the careers industry, she has what it takes to guide you in the "Wright" direction!

Visit her website at www.thewrightcareer.com

Comments

  1. Jo-Ann Fair says:

    Do not use an “Objective Statement”. Use a “Career Summary” instead or you can leave it out all together. I still see those! And the word resume is correctly spelled résumé.

  2. Thanks for your comments Jo-Ann. A Career Summary or the title of the intended position can also be used instead of the Objective.

    With respect to the spelling of resume vs. résumé, I tend to use the former in blog postings as the accents sometimes appear jumbled.

    Thanks again,

    Daisy

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